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1.1.2 Family and Friends Policy and Procedure

SCOPE OF THIS CHAPTER

This procedure applies to all placements provided with Family and Friends.

RELEVANT LEGISLATION AND GUIDANCE

Children Act 1989

The Children and Young Person’s Act 2008

Family and Friends Care: Statutory Guidance for Local Authorities

The Children (Private Arrangements for Fostering) Regulations 2005

AMENDMENT

In May 2014, this chapter was updated to reflect the Child's Assessment, the single assessment which replaced Initial Assessment and Core Assessment.


Contents

  1. Introduction
  2. Principles Underpinning Family and Friends Policy
  3. Children Cared for by Family and Friends Carers
  4. Family and Friends Foster Carers and Looked After Children
  5. Private Fostering
  6. Child Arrangements Orders
  7. Family and Friends Care Outside of LAC Procedures – Assessment and Agreement Process
  8. Family and Friends Foster Carers (Temporary Approval of a Relative, Friend or Connected Person (Under Regulation 24 of the Care Planning, Placement and Case Review (England) Regulations 2010) and Placement of Child with a Connected Person)
  9. Support Services to Family and Friends Carers, Family and Friends Foster Carers and Carers that Proceed to Offer Permanence Through a Child Arrangements or Special Guardianship
  10. Complaints Process
  11. Useful Organisations


1. Introduction

This policy defines the different sort of arrangements that lead to children being cared for by people from within their wider family and friendship network and the role of the Children and Young Peoples Service within those arrangements. It highlights the key principles underpinning the policy, the assessment, planning and decision making process and support services that should be available to the children and carers.


2. Principles Underpinning Family and Friends Policy

The child's welfare is paramount.

If a child cannot live with his/her birth parents, care by Family and Friends carers or Family and Friends Foster Carers for Looked After children is the placement of first choice, provided this meets the needs of the child.

It is essential that a pro-active approach is taken to considering family and friends in the child's network that may be able to offer either short term or long term care.

The family need to be involved in the decision making about future planning for the child where appropriate.

Every child has the right to have the opportunity to develop secure attachments to carers who are capable of providing safe and effective and loving care for the duration of his/her childhood, so that child can thrive and develop.

For most children, the best prospect for their emotional, physical, social, cultural, language and legal needs to be met will be to remain with, or return to live, with their birth parent(s).

If however, a child cannot return home within a timescale that meets his/her needs, then long term care by Family and Friends carers or Family and Friends Foster Carers is the placement of first choice to meet these needs, provided this is consistent with the child's welfare. Under these circumstances, the carers should be supported to obtain an appropriate legal order giving them legal responsibility for the child through a Child Arrangements Order, Special Guardianship Order or Adoption Order.

This policy supports the 'No Order' principle of the Children Act 1989, 'the aim…of the Children Act 1989…is to ensure that an Order is granted only where it will positively improve the child's welfare', (Children Act 1989 Guidance and Regulations, Vol. 1). 

The family and friends policy supports processes for children, who need to be cared for away from home, to be cared for by carers from within the family and friends network, and for the child not to become a Looked After Child unless legal proceedings are essential to safeguard the welfare of the child.

Families themselves are usually best placed to find their own solutions and to make safe plans for children within the family: intervention from the Local Authority should be at the minimum needed to safeguard the welfare of the child and support the family.

Family and Friends carers and the children they care for will be supported in the community by universal services as well as by appropriate services from Children and Young People’s Services.

The majority of Family and Friends carers will have had a previous, or ongoing significant relationship with a child for whom they are offering to care and whose needs they can meet, in circumstances where it has been assessed the child cannot live, either temporarily or permanently with his/her birth parent(s).

Family and Friends arrangements coming within the scope of this Policy and Procedures will have been initiated, facilitated, or supported by Rotherham Metropolitan Borough Council’s Children and Young Peoples Services.

When a child is in Family and Friends care, his/her birth parent(s) retain legal Parental Responsibility, as the child is not looked after or subject to any legal order investing Parental Responsibility in another party. It is therefore essential that clear agreements are made with the birth parents about the day to day care of their child by the Family and Friends carer.


3. Children Cared for by Family and Friends Carers

They are children who are referred to Children and Young People’s Service and who are assessed via a Child’s Assessment as being Children in Need. They may, for whatever circumstances, be children in need of protection from their parents.

The Child’s Assessment for the child and his/her family will have determined that the child cannot live either temporarily or permanently, with his/her birth parent(s), and so needs to be cared for away from home. A Family Group Conference may be considered in such circumstances.

The child's circumstances will be such that, if Family and Friends had not come forward to be assessed to care for the child, then the child would be placed with Local Authority Foster Carers or in residential care whilst permanency planning takes place. 

The child cared for by Family and Friends Carers will not become a Looked After Child, unless he/she needs to do so in order to secure his or her well-being. Consideration will be given to securing the placement by private law orders if necessary.

If the child needs to become a Looked After Child, his or her carers will need to be assessed as Family and Friends Foster Carers.

In the majority of cases, the child will have had a previous, or on-going, significant relationship with the Family and Friends Carers.


4. Family and Friends Foster Carers and Looked After Children

Some children who are placed with Family and Friends carers will need to be Looked After Children and these Family or Friends carers will therefore need to be assessed to become approved as Family and Friends Foster Carers

The Local Authority will always follow the 'No Order' principle in the Children Act 1989 and so reasons must be clearly demonstrated why the child needs an Order, or to be Accommodated, to secure his/her well-being.

The circumstances under which children in Family or Friends care may need to enter the Looked After system or an Order may be needed for the child, may be:

  • When birth parent(s) may not agree, or may be inconsistent, as to their agreement to their child being cared for by the Kinship/Family and Friends Carers. Under these circumstances private law orders would not be appropriate;
  • When there is concern that the child's placement with Family or Friends carers may be seriously disrupted by a birth parent, whose behaviour may have been assessed as being potentially dangerous, or as posing a significant risk;
  • When a Family or Friends carer may feel threatened, or unsafe, in managing contact of the child with the birth parent(s);
  • When a birth parent may be untraceable, or incapable of giving agreement to the child being cared for by the Family or Friends carer. Legal advice should be sought about the appropriateness of a private law order under these circumstances;
  • In any of the above circumstances, it might be assessed that the Local Authority needs to share parental responsibility with the birth parent(s), in order to promote the child's welfare and to secure their placement with the Family and Friends Foster Carers.

A Legal Planning Meeting will need to take place under all these circumstances. If the child needs to become a Looked After Child his/her Family or Friends carers will need to be assessed and approved to become Family and Friends Foster Carers.


5. Private Fostering

In some circumstances, a child's parents may make their own arrangements for care of their child and the Local Authority will not therefore be involved in the setting up of these arrangements.

Private Fostering is an arrangement made between the person with legal Parental Responsibility for a child and the private foster carers: if the Local Authority is involved in making the placement, then the arrangement is not private fostering.

Relatives within the Children Act 1989 definition of relatives (grandparent, aunts, uncles, siblings, step-parents) cannot become private foster carers.

If the care arrangement for the child is to last for longer than 28 days, (in one continuous period, or accumulatively over a year) the private foster carer, or the person with legal parental responsibility for the child, has a duty to inform the Local Authority of the arrangements for the child.

Financial arrangements for the care of the child are made between the person with parental responsibility for the child and the carers. However, the child and his/her carers have the same right as any other family in the community to be assessed for help, including financial help, under Section 17 (Children Act 1989).

Once informed of the private fostering arrangements for the child, the Local Authority has a duty to satisfy itself that the welfare of the child is being satisfactorily safeguarded and promoted. (Children Act '89 Part 1X Section 67 (1)).

There is a duty on the Local Authority to visit the private foster carer’s home and assess the suitability of the placement: by completing Private Fostering Arrangements Assessment Record This is to ensure the home is safe, to obtain information on the private foster carers to ensure they are not disqualified from fostering. All statutory checks on the private foster carers and all adult members of their household need to be carried out.

Once approved as suitable, the fostering service will undertake a full private fostering assessment.

The social worker will visit the child in a private foster home at least once every 6 weeks under Regulation 8 of the The Children (Private Arrangements for Fostering) Regulations 2005.

Regular reviews of the arrangements also need to be undertaken by the Independent Reviewing Officers.

The Private Fostering Arrangement must be approved as suitable by the relevant service manager.

The Local Authority can prevent the placement if the person is disqualified under the terms of the Children Act 1989 or falls within the prohibitions of the Act (Part 1X, 'Private Fostering' Sections 68 and 69).

See Private Fostering Procedure.


6. Child Arrangements Order

A Child Arrangements Order is a Court Order which sets out the arrangements as to when and with whom a child is to live, spend time or otherwise have contact.

These orders replace the previous Contact Orders and Residence Orders.

A Child Arrangements Order may give parental responsibility to the person in whose favour it is made. Parental responsibility is shared with the parents.

Child Arrangements Orders may be made in private family proceedings in which the local authority is not a party nor involved in any way in the arrangements. However, a Child Arrangements Order in favour of a relative or foster carer (who was a 'Connected Person') with whom a child is placed may be an appropriate outcome as part of a permanence plan for a Child in Need or a 'Looked After' child.

The local authority may pay Child Arrangements Order Allowances to relatives or friends, unless they are a spouse or civil partner of a parent, with whom a child is living under a Child Arrangements Order. This is set out in paragraph 15 of Schedule 1 of the Children Act 1989, however this is discretionary.

See the local authority's Child Arrangements Order (with Residence Requirement) Allowance Policy, for details of what financial assistance may be available to holders of Child Arrangements Orders, the applicable criteria and who within the local authority will make decisions under the policy.


7. Family and Friends Care Outside of LAC Procedures – Assessment and Agreement Process

In situations where a child or children need to be cared for away from the birth parents because the parents are not able to safely or adequately care for a child for whatever reason a pro-active approach needs to be taken to consider the suitability and availability of a temporary or on-going placement within the extended family or friendship network.

It is not possible to prescribe for the many types of situations that a fieldwork team may be presented with but it is important to highlight the principles of the policy towards family and friends care and to ensure that the needs of the child are at the forefront of all decision making.

Example 1 – Child's Assessment, short term support to extended family member but no need for continued social work involvement

The area social work teams will be presented with some situations that do not meet the threshold for Section 47 investigations, however the parent may be temporarily unable to provide adequate care for their child for a variety of circumstances.

  • A Child's Assessment will be undertaken and because of the particular circumstances, a parent may make arrangements or be supported to make arrangements for their child to be cared for by a relative. (If a child is cared for by a non-relative for more than 28 days and the placement has been made by the parent then private fostering regulations are applicable) See Private Fostering Procedure;
  • The locality team may decide they need to offer some very short term financial support via Section 17;
  • The locality team Managers have the discretion to decide that in view of the fact that the parent appears to be making adequate arrangements no further assessment of the proposed family carers needs to take place apart from the basic CCM check. They may also signpost the family to other support services.

Example 2 – Section 47 Assessment or Child's Assessment in respect of a child that would meet the threshold to be accommodated or care proceedings to be initiated

  • In many situations the locality teams will be involved in a child protection matter or a case that would meet the threshold for accommodation. A Child’s Assessment under Section 47 is undertaken;
  • An agreement is reached with assessment the birth parents that the child or children concerned need to live elsewhere due to certain risk factors;
  • Basic checks will be undertaken on the family or friends carer that is offering to care for the child; this will need to include appropriate checks on all the adults in the household. SWIFT / CCM checks or a check with the appropriate local authority social services database, register for children subject to a Child Protection Plan checks, Police Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) and Health checks will need to undertaken. (It may be necessary to gain a PNC check until a full DBS check is returned). Where the family and friends carer is already known to Children and Young Peoples Service or another Rotherham Borough Council department all efforts must be made to gain key background information to inform the decision to support a child in such a placement;
  • The accommodation will need to be seen and considered adequate to meet the child’s needs and initial arrangements for contact with birth family and for education and health needs to be met agreed with the birth family and family and friends carer;
  • A basic agreement will need to made between the parties involved which details the expectations of the carers and the parents and the support and supervision arrangements that will be provided by the social work team involved;
  • The child will need to have been consulted as appropriate dependent on the child’s age and his or her views recorded;
  • The Service Manager will be for responsible for agreeing a placement on an emergency basis following the basic checks and the support plan for an arrangement for the child to be cared for by a family and friends carer outside of the LAC system;
  • It is intended that most of these situations will be short term arrangements for the care of the child. If the child cannot be cared for by their birth parent in the longer term then the family and friends carer should be supported to consider applying for a legal order which gives them parental responsibility and therefore affords the child greater protection and stability;
  • Some family and friends carers will live at some distance from Rotherham Metropolitan Borough Council.  Any plan for support needs to identify appropriate local resources that can be accessed;
  • On some occasions a family and friends carer will be identified to care for a parent and their child offering a parent and baby placement. If the family and friends carer is to play a key role with responsibility for the baby and potentially the parent (if that parent is under 16 years) this arrangement needs to be considered in the same way as other family and friends care arrangements outside of the LAC process and appropriate checks made and agreements and support plans put in place.


8. Family and Friends Foster Carers (Temporary Approval of a Relative, Friend or Connected Person (Under Regulation 24 of the Care Planning, Placement and Case Review (England) Regulations 2010) and Placement of Child with a Connected Person)

Click here to view The Care Planning, Placement and Case Review (England) Regulations 2010.

The key regulations that apply to family and friends foster placements are the Care Planning, Placement and Case Review Regulations 2010.

There will be circumstances where the most appropriate placement for a looked after child is with a “connected person”.

A “connected person” is a relative (i.e. family member), a family friend or someone connected with the child. (A person in this last category may be someone who knows the child in a more professional capacity such as a childminder, a teacher or a youth worker although these are not exclusive categories. Such people would not fit the term “relative or friend” but nevertheless may be an appropriate person with whom to place a child because of this pre-existing connection.)

Most children benefit from living with relatives, friends or other connected people because they are likely to provide more continuity than a placement with previously unknown carers. Such arrangements preserve a child’s sense of belonging to a wider family network; a close attachment is more likely to exist already or to develop and there is also some evidence to suggest that relatives are less likely to reject a child if difficulties arise. However not all relatives are able to safeguard and promote a child’s welfare, and their parenting capacity and wider family and environmental factors should be rigorously assessed before approval as local authority foster carers.

The Care Planning, Placement and Case Review (England) Regulations 2010 set out the arrangements for the temporary approval of a Connected Person (regulation 24 and 25). As with any other placement the local authority must be satisfied that the placement is the most suitable means to safeguard and promote the child’s welfare.

Subject to the successful completion of the assessment to temporarily approve a Connected Person (regulation 24), they may be immediately approved as a temporary local authority foster carer for a period not exceeding 16 weeks by the local authority’s Agency Decision Maker. This time period has been set to allow sufficient time for a foster carer approval process to be undertaken

In exceptional circumstances, regulation 25 allows for the period of temporary approval to be extended. These circumstances are either where the approval process has taken longer than anticipated (in these circumstances the temporary approval may be extended for a further eight weeks) or where the connected person has not been approved following the assessment process and seeks a review of the decision through the Independent Reviewing Mechanism (IRM). A request for an extension of a further 8 weeks can only be approved by the Agency Decision Maker after consideration by the Fostering Panel. In the latter circumstances the temporary approval will continue until the outcome of the review is known. When these time periods expire and if the connected person has not been approved by the authority in accordance with the Regulations, the responsible authority must arrange for an alternative placement and remove the child from the placement with the connected person.

These provisions in the 2010 Regulations are intended to be used exceptionally and where there are clearly identified reasons why the full assessment process cannot be undertaken before a placement is made. If a child is placed before the full approval of the carer as a local authority foster carer, there is a possibility that the connected person may not be approved at the end of the assessment process. The risk of a child being moved from a placement in which (s)he has become settled must be minimised by careful consideration of the appropriateness of a placement before full approval. In some circumstances it may be preferable to use a short term placement with an alternative foster carer which includes appropriate contact between the child and the prospective carer pending the completion of the full foster carer approval process.

As the Connected Person will be temporarily approved as a foster carer (s)he will be required to comply with the 2011 Fostering Regulations and sign a foster care agreement and the requirement for a care plan and placement plan remains. A connected person approved under these regulations will be entitled to the same support and services, including any allowances and skills fees available within Rotherham’s Fostering Service to unrelated local authority foster carers.

See Placements with Connected Persons Procedure.


9. Support Services to Family and Friends Carers, Family and Friends Foster Carers and Carers that Proceed to Offer Permanence Through a Child Arrangements Order or Special Guardianship

It is essential that family and friends carers are provided with access to support services as appropriate to enable them to continue to provide safe and stable care for a child.

Family and Friends foster carers will have a supervising social worker from the Fostering Team and will have access to training and support services provided to other foster carers. They will be paid an appropriate foster care allowance.

Family and friends carers that are caring for a child outside of the LAC system will have a support plan as part of the original assessment which will need to be kept under regular review by the appropriate Area team.

Most family and friends placements that are either supported by the Department for children outside of the LAC system by Section 17 or within the LAC system by the foster care allowance should be regularly reviewed with the presumption that if the child is to remain the placement should be secured by a legal order conferring parental responsibility on the carers.

Family and friends carers should not be discouraged from applying for a Child Arrangements Order or Special Guardianship Order because they do not have confidence in the support services that will then be provided for them and the child.

This policy supports the 'No Order' principle of the Children Act 1989, 'the aim …of the Children Act 1989…is to ensure that an Order is granted only where it will positively improve the child's welfare', (Children Act 1989 Guidance and Regulations, Vol. 1). 

The family and friends policy supports processes for children, who need to be cared for away from home, to be cared for by carers from within the family and friends network, and for the child not to become a Looked After Child unless legal proceedings are essential to safeguard the welfare of the child.

Families themselves are usually best placed to find their own solutions and to make safe plans for children within the family: intervention from the Local Authority should be at the minimum needed to safeguard the welfare of the child and support the family.

Family and Friends carers and the children they care for will be supported in the community by universal services as well as by appropriate services from Children and Young People’s Services

The majority of Family and Friends carers will have had a previous, or ongoing significant relationship with a child for whom they are offering to care and whose needs they can meet, in circumstances where it has been assessed the child cannot live, either temporarily or permanently with his/her birth parent(s).

Family and Friends arrangements coming within the scope of this Policy and Procedures will have been initiated, facilitated, or supported by Rotherham Metropolitan Borough Council Children and Young People’s Services.

When a child is in Family and Friends care, his/her birth parent(s) retain legal parental responsibility, as the child is not looked after or subject to any legal order investing parental responsibility in another party. It is therefore essential that clear agreements are made with the birth parents about the day to day care of their child by the Family and Friends carer.

See Child Arrangements (with Residence Requirements) / Special Guardianship Order Applications Procedure.


10. Complaints Process

Where a Family or Friends carer feels they have not received the appropriate level of support, they should have access to the Local Authority’s complaints procedure. Complaints can be received by telephone, email, face-to-face or online. A complaint may be received directly within a service, via the CYPS complaints service or the corporate complaints service. In the first instance we will seek to respond at the informal problem solving stage where the complaint is looked into locally by the relevant Service Area, usually at Line/Team Manager level. If this is unsuccessful the issue will proceed to Level 2 of the complaints procedure. The Complaints Guidance for Managers has full details of the RMBC process for responding to complaints.


11. Useful Organisations

Action for Prisoners’ Families

Works to reduce the negative impact of imprisonment on prisoners' families. Produces publications and resources, and provides advice, information and training as well as networking opportunities.

Address: Unit 21, Carlson Court 116 Putney Bridge Road London, SW15 2NQ
Tel: 020 8812 3600
Advice line: 0808 808 2003
E-mail: info@actionpf.org.uk / info@prisonersfamilieshelpline.org.uk
Website: www.prisonersfamilies.org.uk

Addaction

Offers a range of support developed for families and carers affected by substance misuse.

Address: 67-69 Cowcross Street London EC1M 6PU
Tel: 020 7251 5860
Email: info@addaction.org.uk
Website: www.addaction.org.uk

Adfam

Works with families affected by drugs and alcohol, and supports carers of children whose parents have drug and alcohol problems.

Address: 25 Corsham Street, London N1 6DR
Tel: 020 7553 7640
Email: admin@adfam.org.uk
Website: www.adfam.org.uk

Advisory Centre for Education (ACE)

Offers free independent advice and information for parents and carers on a range of state education and schooling issues, including admissions, exclusion, attendance, special educational needs and bullying.

Address: 1c Aberdeen Studios, 22 Highbury Grove, London N5 2DQ
General Advice Line: 0808 800 5793
Exclusion Advice Line: 0808 800 0327
Exclusion Information Line: 020 7704 9822 (24hr answer phone)
Website: www.ace-ed.org.uk

British Association for Adoption and Fostering (BAAF)

Provides information and advice about adoption and fostering and publishes resources.

Address: Saffron House, 6-10 Kirby Street, London EC1N 8TS
Tel: 020 7421 2600
Email: mail@baaf.org.uk
Website: www.baaf.org.uk

Children’s Legal Centre

Provides free independent legal advice and factsheets to children, parents, carers and professionals.

Address: University of Essex Wivenhoe Park Colchester Essex CO4 3SQ
Tel: 01206 877 910
Child Law Advice Line: 0808 802 0008
Community Legal Advice - Education: 0845 345 4345
E-mail: clc@essex.ac.uk
Website: www.childrenslegalcentre.com

Citizens Advice Bureau

Helps people resolve their legal, money and other problems by providing free, independent and confidential advice through local bureau and

Website: www.citizensadvice.org.uk

Department for Education

Details of telephone help lines and online services to provide information, advice and support on a range of issues that parents and families may face in bringing up children and young people.

Website: www.education.gov.uk/childrenandyoungpeople/families

Family Fund Trust

Helps families with severely disabled or seriously ill children to have choices and the opportunity to enjoy ordinary life. Gives grants for things that make life easier and more enjoyable for the disabled child and their family.

Address: 4 Alpha Court Monks Cross Drive York YO32 9WN
Tel: 0845 130 4542
Email: info@familyfund.org.uk
Website: www.familyfund.org.uk

Family Rights Group (FGR)

Provides advice to parents and other family members whose children are involved with or require children’s social care services because of welfare needs or concerns. Publishes resources, helps to develop support groups for family and friends carers, and runs a discussion board.

Address: Second Floor The Print House 18 Ashwin Street London E8 3DL
Tel: 020 7923 2628
Advice line: 0800 801 0366
Email: advice@frg.org.uk
Website: www.frg.org.uk

The Fostering Network

Supports foster carers and anyone with an interest in fostering to improve the lives of children in care. Publishes resources and runs Fosterline, a confidential advice line for foster carers including concerns about a child's future, allegations and complaints, legislation and financial matters.

Address: 87 Blackfriars Road London SE1 8HA
Tel: 020 7620 6400
Email: info@fostering.net
Fosterline: 0800 040 7675
Email: fosterline@fostering.net
Website: www.fostering.net

The Grandparents’ Association

Supports grandparents and their families, especially those who have lost or are losing contact with their grandchildren because of divorce, separation or other family problems, those caring for their grandchildren on a full-time basis, and those with childcare responsibilities for their grandchildren.

Address: Moot House The Stow Harlow Essex CM20 3AG
Tel: 01279 428040
Helpline: 0845 434 9585
Welfare benefits advice and information: 0844 357 1033
Email: info@grandparents-association.org.uk
Website: www.grandparents-association.org.uk

Grandparents Plus

Champions the role of grandparents and the wider family in children's lives, especially when they take on the caring role in difficult family circumstances.

Address: Grandparents Plus 18 Victoria Park Square Bethnal Green London E2 9PF
Tel: 020 8981 8001
Email: info@grandparentsplus.org.uk

Mentor UK

Promotes the health and wellbeing of children and young people to reduce the damage that drugs can do to lives.

Address: Fourth Floor 74 Great Eastern Street London EC2A 3JG
Tel: 020 7739 8494
Email: admin@mentoruk.org
Website: www.mentoruk.org.uk

Family Mediation Helpline

Provides information and advice about family mediation services and eligibility for public funding.

Tel: 08456 026627
Website: www.familymediationhelpline.co.uk

National Family Mediation (NFM)

Provides mediation services to support couples who are separated, and their children and others affected by this.

Address: 4 Barnfield Hill, Exeter EX1 1SR
Tel: 0300 4000 636
Email: general@nfm.org.uk
Website: www.nfm.org.uk

Partners of Prisoners and Families Support Group

Operates helpline and provides a variety of services to support anyone who has a link with someone in prison, prisoners and other agencies.

Address: Valentine House 1079 Rochdale Road Blackley Manchester M9 8AJ
Tel: 0161 702 1000
Offenders’ Families Helpline Tel: 0808 808 2003
Email: info@prisonersfamilieshelpline.co.uk
Website: www.partnersofprisoners.co.uk

Prison Advice and Care Trust (PACT)

Provides practical and emotional support to prisoners and to their children and families. The Kinship Care Support Service provides support and advice to family members and friends who care for children whose parents are in HMP Holloway.

Address: Park Place 12 Lawn Lane Vauxhall London SW8 1UD
Tel: 020 7735 9535
Website: www.prisonadvice.org.uk

Parents Against Drug Abuse (PADA)

Delivers support and services to the families of substance users, including a national helpline.

Address: The Foundry Marcus Street Birkenhead CH41 1EU
Tel: 0151 649 1580
National Families Helpline: 08457 023867
Website: www.btinternet.com/~padahelp/

Parentline Plus

Provides help and support in all aspects of family life, including information, an online chat facility and a 24 hour helpline.

Address: CAN Mezzanine 49-51 East Road London N1 6AH
Tel: 020 7553 3080
24hr Advice Line: 0808 800 2222
Email: parentsupport@familylives.org.uk
Website: www.familylives.org.uk

TalktoFrank

The government's national drugs helpline which offers free confidential drugs information and advice 24 hours a day. Information and advice is also available via the website.

24 hour advice line: 0800 77 66 00
Text: 82111
Email: frank@talktofrank.com
Website: www.talktofrank.com

Voice

Advocacy organisation for children living away from home or in need.

Address: 320 City Road London EC1V 2NZ
Tel: 020 7833 5792
Young Person’s Advice Line: 0808 800 5792
Email: info@voiceyp.org
Website: www.voiceyp.org

Young Minds

Works to improve the emotional wellbeing and mental health of children and young people and empowering their parents and carers.

Address: 48-50 St John Street London EC1M 4DG
Tel: 020 7336 8445
Parents Helpline: 0808 802 5544
Website: www.youngminds.org.uk

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